Learn a Unique Japanese Martial Art in Canada

Address:

PO Box 116 La Ronge SK S0J 1L0

Last Few Months of 2015

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With the 2015 year almost coming to an end, we can reflect on two successful  MSR Seminar in Canada, the most recent in the weekend of October 3 and 4, 2015.

Following this exciting training weekend, Meifu Shinkage-ryû Saskatchewan Keikokai has updated the training schedule to include the following training sessions:

    • Monday evening, Gordon Denny School, 8-9pm; Fundo Kusari-jutsu
    • Tuesday evening, Saskatchewan home dojo: Shuriken-jutsu – Shoken-jutsu – Shuto-jutsu
    • Sunday, 4pm CST: Online sessions through Appear.in/MSR-Saskatchewan

If you wish to attend any of the sessions, please do so at your discretion.
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Keiko August 10

2 hour session.

Bo-shuriken focused on shomenuchi, za-uchi, and gyaku-uchi only. Our goal was to throw without force; with proper hand positioning and brushing, the shuriken should fly naturally.

Continuing from a previous session, we tried throwing small nails with a length of 2.5 inch as well as the fork. Besides having quite some fun with this, it allowed us to further explore hand position, balance, grip, and brushing.

Keiko July 29

2 hour session.

We have been starting our sessions with either short taijutsu or jutaijutsu workouts as warmups. During this training, we did some omote gyaku and oni kudaki, as well as mune dori from Shinken Fudo ryu to warm up all the joints and movable parts.

Bo-shuriken focused on shomenuchi and za-uchi only. Our goal was to throw without thought, but yet emphasize accurate brushing. We noticed an incredible difference in shomenuchi with brushing and without brushing (or less brushing). We also noted how angled brushing alters the direction of the bo-shuriken.

Za-uchi practice was done from 2 ken, to better train the short but strong hip movement.

Session May 3rd, 2015

We had quite the week last week, here is an overview of what was worked on. Hip rotation and power generation while relaxing was the focus of all sessions.

Monday evening (April 27)

– Short primer on Kusari Fundojutsu: Ippon-me to Roppon-me, focusing on proper hip rotation. 20 minute session

Tuesday evening (April 28)

– Outside session. We worked on Shomenuchi from 2 and 2.5 ken, alternating with Shomenuchi hanten daho from about 5 ken. This was a challenge, but very interesting to explore. 2 hour session

Thursday morning (April 30)

– Shomenuchi from 1.5 and 2 ken. 1 hour session

Sunday morning (May 3)

– Shurikenjutsu, focusing on gyaku uchi only: the diagonal and horizontal variety. 1 hour session.

Session Log April 25, 2015

[av_four_fifth first] [av_textblock size=” font_color=” color=”] One night, early last week, I was browsing through Someya-Sensei’s book “Kakushibuki jutsu Nyumon”, and discovered a section with techniques that looked very familiar to skills I learned about 30 years ago during Wado-ryû karate-jutsu class (I never learned those in Shotokan or Gensei-ryu). I am referring to the Shuto jutsu (手刀) techniques, explained from page 50 and up. Today, I decided to explore and dissect some of the techniques from the still images in the book. These techniques are very close to tegatana or te-waza in older forms of karate. After a while, I realized that the techniques contain footwork that is rare in modern karate-do, much more relaxed and shorter than in most Japanese karate. Some of the footwork and hand techniques almost look more like they were inspired by methods such as those from Motobu-Sensei, going back to the Okinawan origin of karate-jutsu (or kenpo) rather than karate-do. Besides seeming very effective defensive techniques, they also feel like they were intended to prepare hand and arm, as well as hip and foot for working with Shoken-jutsu and other Kakushi buki. Although I only explored a few techniques, we will definitely incorporate these skills into the Saskatchewan Keikokai curriculum, as recommended by Otsuka-Sensei. I find it fascinating that there are always new doors opening in the world of Budo, sometimes hidden in books, other times hidden in plain sight. [/av_textblock] [/av_four_fifth] [av_comments_list] [av_social_share title=’Share this entry’ style=” buttons=” share_facebook=” share_twitter=” share_pinterest=” share_gplus=” share_reddit=” share_linkedin=” share_tumblr=” share_vk=” share_mail=”][/av_social_share]

Session April 18, 2015

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Participants: Kelvin, Chris.

Today, we had two sessions. Earlier in the day, I decided to use materials that I had on hand to build an outside shuriken target. I did not want to make a permanent target, since my son often plays in the backyard and has friends over. Over the wood, I installed 3 layers of used puzzle-mats. On top of that, I placed the actual target mat. This way, the shuriken does not penetrate the wood as much, which preserves the tip much better.

First session: After the target was build (in the rain), I practiced nikyu waza, focusing on shomen-uchi and gyaku-uchi from 1.5 ken. The birds, who had arrived earlier in the morning, sang a nice song and were eagerly looking for seeds. After about 1 hour, it started to rain heavily, and therefore discontinued the training.

Second session: A few hours later, Kelvin joined for indoor-training. We focused on Gokyu waza, going through all kamae, tenouchi, zanshin, and reiho. Performing technique, we spent quite some time on ashi-sabaki and hip movement. Kelvin’s skill really improved during this hour.

Next session: Tuesday April 21, 2015, 7:oopm
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Session April 14, 2015

Participants: Darren, Chris (just under 2 hours)

Most of the training with Bou shuriken was done from 1.5 ken: shomenuchi, za-uchi, and gyaku-uchi. W also did a few shitate-uchi and dosoku-uchi to mix things up a bit. One of the techniques we worked on was aiming at a low target, and then aiming at a high target as done during the seminar. The aim was on precision.

We ended the session with fundo kusarijutsu, ippon-me to roppon-me, with relaxed swings and proper execution of each strike. We will continue with Fundo Kusarijutsu next Monday in the gym, focusing on distance and aim by using several objects at different distances.

Next sessions have been scheduled for April 20 (fundo kusarijutsu) and April 21 (Shurikenjutsu)

Session April 6, 2015

Participants: Darren, Kelvin, Chris.

Today, we had a guest participant joining us, to see if he would like to become a member. The session was planned around Fundo Kusari jutsu, and we worked on Ippon-me to Yonhon-me. Metsubushi and kosei uchi were practices against shomenuchi with bokuto, to learn the understand the concept of distance while using the fundo kusari.

In addition, we did quite some exercises on footwork: Balance, placement of the feet as well as proper timing.

Next session has been scheduled for April 14.

Session March 31, 2015

Participants: Darren, Chris.

This session was about 1.5 hours long. We started with reflection on the seminar, and shared tips, adaptations, and exercises that Otsuka-Sensei had shared with each of us. We then briefly discussed a way to setup a “semi-permanent” target stand for use outside. Techniques we trained focused mainly on shuriken-jutsu: shomenuchi from various distances, as well as gyaku-uchi from 1 ken.

We also did a trial run with the online collaboration system, to allow other participants to “virtually” attend our training sessions when they are not available for in-person training in La Ronge. Chris discussed this with Otsuka-Sensei beforehand as an opportunity for connecting our more distant Saskatchewan Keikokai members. The virtual system turns out to only have a delay of about 1/2 of a second, with crystal clear (almost) live video. An excellent way of training together over longer distances, especially when each of us are on the road so often. It does not replace in-person training though, and each member understands the requirement for frequent group training sessions.

Chris also created a training log for each member, consisting of a Moleskine Cahier. In this journal, participants reflect on their training sessions (group training and individual training), document which techniques were trained on, and keep track of their training hours. This was done to allow the minimum training period of 3 months per Kyu level become  meaningful, since there is a difference between a participant training 3 times per week during a 3-month stretch, and a participant who trains once per 2 weeks in the same stretch. We believe the focus is on quality, quantity, and effort combined.

 

Session March 20, 2015

Participants: Otsuka-Sensei, Chris.

Thank you sensei for a fantastic private session. We worked on 5th and 4th kyu level waza, with Bou-Shuriken, and 3 kata for fundo kusari. Many great teachable moments, lots of great insight.

Looking forward to Saturday and Sunday.

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